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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 25, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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♪ in fact, on tuesday's list of google's hottest search terms, general mcchrystal beat out jake and vienna break up. that's right! the afghan war is finally more important to americans than season 14 of "the bachelor." so general petraeus, you've got to keep their interest. i suggest you locate your headquarters in a cave-side mansion filled with cameras, ten bachelorettes and your second in
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command, lieutenant colonel the situation. >> i'd watch that show. welcome to "morning joe." i'm willie geist. joe and mika have the day off today but i've surrounded myself with a galaxy of stars. norah o'donnell and in los angeles, the h and h boys, mark halpern and jon heilman look so pleased to be here. are you still awake or did you wake up for the show, halpern? do naps count? >> you've been out partying? >> straight on through. >> we just come from an east l.a. taco truck. >> we will give you a minute to take a nap and bounce some stuff around the table here. we haven't talked to you since the mcchrystal shake-up. how did the president perform?
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>> a plus. he has no choice. say what you want, whether strategically a right move what is going on in afghanistan. as a commander in chief, as a ceo when one of your top lieutenants, one of your aides publicly disparaging your people, have you no choice. had he not done it, whatever questions about his questions about his leadership and testosterone, he had no choice. there is not even a gray area here. >> what you're saying was backed up yesterday with gates and mullen. i know that leads off your news. >> president obama's national security team making its first public comments about general stanley mcchrystal leaving his post as the top commander in afghanistan. at a pentagon briefing yesterday, secretary of defense robert gates and admiral robert mullen said there is no excuse for the controversial comments mcchrystal made to "rolling
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stone." >> honestly when i first read it, i was nearly sick. it made me -- i literally physically -- i don't believe it. so i was stunned. >> in the 3 1/2 years that i've been in this position, i have not felt any tension or issues with respect to my relationship with our uniformed leaders or people in the ranks. this is an anomaly, not a systemic problem. >> mark halpern in l.a., you look the more awake of the two. then we kick it over to john. >> thanks, willie. >> we sat here, mark, on the set on tuesday as this was unfolding before our eyes. you said they got to do something by the end of the day.
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they did get rid of him the next day. how do you think this has shaken out since then? >> first off, i'm only the more awake by default, i want to make that clear. you know, i thought they had to do something by the end of the day. i thought the president was smart to do it the way he did. this was really from the minute they began the stage craft of this to the rose garden statement which i think was his most presidential moment since he was in office, the president handled it well. if petraeus was not waiting in the wings to take over, i think he would have more problems. having petraeus there provides the continuity what the mission needs. petraeus, unlike mcchrystal, gets along with the people in washington and the people in the theater. president handled this as well as he has handled anything else. i think the reaction that probably speaks the biggest and loudest is from republicans. this is a president who almost no matter what he does gets criticized by the other party.
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in this case, almost every republican is not only on board, but pleased with the outcome and that is quite something and important because this is going to take a bipartisan backing to get this policy right. >> john heilemann, john mccain saying two days ago he believes this is the quickest confirmation hearing in the history of the armed services committee. >> you could see also yesterday in the clips that you played, you know, the armed forces and the civilian leadership of the pentagon, obviously, closing ranks around the decision and as mark said, you know, the silence of republicans, not just -- the support of them not just on the hill but even the conservative commentary. it was astonishing after the president announced the decision just how quiet and mute the president's critics on fox news and other places were they were dumb founded and left speech is -- speech lieutenants. you know how unusual that is,
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willie. >> david petraeus is a bullet-proof figure some. >> without petraeus this would be hard to accomplish as smoothly as he did. i say two additional things. one, it does put afghanistan, which is what has been said over and over again, back front and center in some of the conversations and what is our strategy there. two, what i found most amazing, general mcchrystal didn't question, deny, or suggest anything that was said was not said. >> his judgment in general. everybody is focused on obama's move versus what is going on in this guy's brain that he would do that in the first place. >> he didn't deny one piece of it. >> we said yesterday, a guy who prides himself on splin and read the stories. i eat one meal a day and run seven miles. how about opening up to "rolling stone" and batching your boss? president obama will shift his attention to the economy as he heads to toronto for this weekend's g-20 summit.
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yesterday at a news conference with russian president the president was focused on the war in afghanistan insisting the change of commander does not mean a change in strategy. the president dismissing suggestions that the leadership shake-up would affect his timetable for the withdrawal of u.s. troops set to begin next summer. >> we did not say that starting july in 2011, suddenly, there would be no troops from the united states or allied countries in afghanistan. we didn't say we would be switching off the lights and closing the door behind us. we said as we began a transition phase in which the afghan government is taking on more and more responsibility. >> that was the president's clearest description of his timetable of bringing troops home next year, a schedule many analysts feel is unrealistic.
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general david petraeus is backing the july 11 -- i should say july 2011 timetable. after touring capitol hill yesterday, petraeus said his appointment did not alter the planned troop withdrawal. when asked about mcchrystal's dismissal, he said it was very sad he had to command afghanistan in such a manner and he had enormous respect for general mcchrystal. >> harold, we've been asking every elected official who comes on this show to give us the thumbnail argument why we are in afghanistan. we never get a clear one. isn't this a good moment to clarify the mission as the president tried to do yesterday? >> the answer to your question is yes. i think they are trying to clarify the mission by defining the exit. i think most americans, said on the show questioned -- yesterday or the day before -- first of all, i don't think a lot of americans realize we were there to the extent we are and we have almost 100,000 troops on the ground. i think many americans believe
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it is less. two, the president owns us now in every which way and it's always convenient to blame some on your predecessor and some attempt to do this but at the end of the day, the president has general petraeus in charge and he has to answer with results. >> i thought the most fascinating thing in the mcchrystal story other than the stuff that made the headlines was about what mcchrystal was trying to do in afghanistan which is a strategy called coin. he was using as "the rolling stone" points out, use it as a laboratory for a controversial military strategy where they pair this high tech technology and engage in nation building with a lot of ground troops and that is extremely controversial. it was something that the vice president disagreed with and it's fascinating to read that's at the end of the article that everybody probably didn't get to, but one of the most fascinating thing about the mcchrystal strategy that
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petraeus will now carry out. >> donnie, you're in the business of selling things. how do you sell this a decade in to the american people? >> i think simplification of message. as i understand it, we're there for one reason basically that is the breeding ground for terrorists and to build infrastructure, build some type of ecosystem that stops that breeding that stops the taliban allowing that to happen. to me if i'm selling it, that's what i'm selling it. this is the hot bed of terrorists. whether an oversimplification. the one thing the president has not done, whether it's health care, is being able to break things down to the signed bite. going back to "the rolling stone." i wonder who in all of the pr is saying, yes, let's have the commander in chief sit down with "rolling stone"? >> no doubt in all of the people i talked to this was bone-headed strategy but allow him to go out when they went drinking at night in an irish pub. >> and rolling stone! >> in a hotel room. >> not like they threw a mike in
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his face one they sat with him four times. >> described in the article was pretty drunk. >> i was in washington and i heard maybe this is his way of getting his views out in unfiltered by was he. two, his judgment, he is such a bright guy. why did he do this if he didn't have some agenda himself is what some are suggesting. probably getting too deep in it. he has now been removed in the post and petraeus is in charge and the most important thing is keep the morale of the troops up. >> mark halpern out in los angeles, is the new focus on afghanistan this week a good thing for president obama? >> well, i think it is, because i don't think he can fight a war like this without public support. we don't normally think of the job of general as one where you need to be really media savvy but a tale of two different
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generals here. mcchrystal whether he did this on purpose or not has a history of not understanding how the press works and play the media. one of petraeus greatest strengths, he is the most media savvy military person we've seen since secretary-general colin powell. i think we will see this dirty little problem which is people, as was just said, people in america are not focused enough on this war a and they don't understand the mission and not enough backing for it. petraeus gives the president a huge public relations asset to sell the war and pretty good relationships with the people in afghanistan. so he's an upgrade in a lot of ways including the pr part which is a huge part of what the president needs. >> couldn't be -- >> i just have to add -- willie, he gives the president something else going forward which is if the mission here is as confused and possibly as hopeless as some
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pessimists think we have the strategy review on afghan policy at the end of this year. petraeus gives the president some cover. if that review goes forward, i think petraeus gives the president much better cover than mcchrystal would have given him for making a drawdown and getting america out of afghanistan and recognize that maybe we can't win this war and can't accomplish our locker room objectives there. he is probably the best face for that if that is eventually where we will end up. >> guys, we let you put your snuggies back on and go back to norah. cleanup crews in mississippi on high alert as large amounts of crude move closer to the state's futile barrier islands. a large patch of oil has crept into the mississippi sound. in florida, oil has forced authorities to close a popular section of beach near the alabama border.
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all this as a tropical storm mass is forming around the gulf that could head into oil-soaked waters within the next few days. pretty scary. the debate over the government's six-month deep water drilling moratorium will drag on today after a federal judge said yesterday he would not reconsider his decision to halt the ban. the obama administration wanted the ban in place while investigators look into the cause of the april 20th rig explosion. the interior department has said it will appeal the decision. all right. coming up next, an exclusive first look at the top stories in the politico playbook. republicans block an election year jobs bill. what it means for the president and the fall mid terms. later, the week in review. find out which of these important stories will make the cut. severe weather ripped through the northeast yesterday. here is bill karins. weekend is about here. good friday morning. a lot of nasty weather from extreme heat in washington, d.c. where it was 100 yesterday. to the severe weather that hit
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connecticut. take a look at the pictures out of bridgeport, connecticut. severe storms rolled through. this was a possible tornado. it hasn't been confirmed yet. the tornado may have been mixed in with the rain so it was hard to view. national weather service will be up there this morning to tell us if it was officially a tornado or not. a lot of heavy rain in philadelphia to atlantic city, new jersey. they had -- the phillies game was rained out. look at that. nearly impossible to put the tarp down on the field and that game was officially rained out. what is happening in the tropics, possibly watching the first tropical sl developing. right now a tropical wave located south of jamaica and could make it up into the gulf of mexico. yes, that gulf where the oil is by the weekend. a 60% chance this will become a tropical depression. we will watch it all weekend long. severe weather reports yesterday from boston to new york city to just out of philadelphia. forecast, today is gorgeous,
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folks. this is a great friday. temperatures in the 80s. full sunshine and humidity is down. the rest of the country looks very summer-like. just watch out in minneapolis. a chance of some severe storms as we go throughout the day today. overall, the weather pattern has gotten pretty quiet but keep our eyes down on the gulf. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ all i want is to see you smile ♪ smart...you're staying at this resort for free? how? welcomerewards from hotels.com. see when i accumulate 10 nights, i get one free. and...they let me choose where to use them. the loyalty program he signed us up for has all these restrictions, blackout dates, a crazy point system... and we couldn't stay here. so what am i getting for free? my undying love?
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♪ he went to the white house yesterday and it took president obama 45 minutes to make a decision to pick a new afghanistan commander. 45 minutes. hell, it took him six months to pick a dog for the white house. >> it was successful with the
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counterinsurgency in iraq. he will keep our momentum going. what is his goal some. >> we have a clear goal. we are going to break the taliban's momentum. >> oh. i thought we had the momentum! how did they get it? when did they get the momentum? >> we're working to break the momentum of the taliban insurgents. we must break the momentum of a taliban insurgency. reverse the taliban's momentum. we will break the taliban's momentum. >> we will reverse the taliban's momentum. >> momentum in december? >> guess so. let's take a look at the morning papers. "the wall street journal," cheeseburger diplomacy. president obama told russian president medvedev. >> a day after oil washed ashore in pensacola, most of was gone from its beaches.
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either cleaned up or buried or swept back into the sea. there are vessels that will work day and night skimming for oil. the "los angeles times." passion alone can't sustain the tea party. the movement has as many losses at the ballot box as it doeses. "the seattle times." boeing parks 787s after tail trouble. boeing insist the planes are not grounded and near mooerly not flying until inspections are complete. the company expects to complete the first dream liner by the end of the year. >> i was about to ask willie since you're driving the ship, i feel lost without a woman abusing me and i was going to ask you to ask norah to do it and she just filled the hole. >> sorry! >> at least i'm on balance. >> it's a long morning. we have three hours to take shots at you, donnie.
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"t ""the boston globe."" p-town to rethink condom policy. your kindergartner can get condoms if he is so inclined. the governor expressing concern yesterday that very young children would have access to them. why? donnie, your thoughts. >> my thoughts? my thoughts were my 6-year-old went in to one of my drawers and walked out with it and i said it was a -- i don't remember what i said. it should be in the hands of young kids. i don't know why i brought that up! by the way, i can see the blogs already. >> norah, will you stay on donnie even more? >> obviously, it's -- i'm sorry. i'm going to leave now. okay. >> norah, turn up the heat on him a little bit. he is getting too comfortable. >> let's turn to the editor and chief of politico, mr. john
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harris. >> happy friday. >> happy friday. >> incidentally, they do make good water balloons. >> thank you! where were you when i needed? i was tongue-tied! >> i understand, john, late night dealing in the senate last night in the financial reg bill. tell us about it. >> late night, early morning, they pulled an all-nighter. you could watch it live on c-span. parts of it were dramatic and parts were like watching the grass grow. bottom line they did come up with an agreement to send financial reg reform to president obama. it has to clear both houses but they did strike a deal and tough on wall street and amounts to a big victory for democrats and once president obama signs it, it's a big victory for him. the process is messy but you have to step back and say, look, the past three, four months he has passed health care reform and overhaul of wall street and two lags of his triple crown energy. >> harold, you're a titan of
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wall street. does this strike fear in the eyes of the financial services? >> i still think people are going to wait to see the outcome. i ask john this question. how much credence and concern were given to this recovery, the rebound back and forth? the roller coaster ride on wall street in terms of the dow? were there great concerns expressed by members by what this final piece of legislation could do to the markets and to the economic recovery? >> congressman, what surprised me those concerns didn't end up having as much consequences as we expected. i think if you go a step back a month or two, certainly at the beginning of the year they thought in the end they would come out with a softer bill that would be much more congenial to them and, in fact, this is a much tougher bill than they were anticipating. out. now overnight this bill is better at 5:00 a.m. than yesterday at 5:00 p.m. the compromises overnight,
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blanche lincoln did give some ground on her proposals on derivatives. the rule got some exceptions so allows the banking houses to trade so they want something. this is a much tougher bill than washington was expecting. >> mark halpern, as john said the president gets his health care reform and now some version of financial reform. what does it mean for him? >> he is accomplishing a lot of the things he wants to do. even his critics have to focus the president said he would do certain things when he ran and he is getting a lot of them done. health care is a big one. this is not an insignificant one either. i know john harris agrees he may get energy bill as well. that is a lot of accomplishment in half a term and you bet you, the president is going to talk about that come september when he is trying to rally the country behind the democratic party saying we're getting stuff done. >> the other big thing on his agenda, afghanistan. of course, president obama talking about that yesterday. clarifying the mission a little
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better, restating it, i should say. why are some people on the left turning on him on this? >> we did some reporting on capitol hill yesterday and we found, you know, no surprise but there is huge discontent, growing discontent among the liberal caucus particularly in the house about afghanistan. the president said he is changing commanders but not changing strategy. a lot of people are saying you ought to change strategy as well. general petraeus was certainly a great pick for obama in june 2010. it's not clear in june 2011 he will be, because it's a doubling down strategy by obama when a lot of liberals clearly say that he should be heading for the exits on afghanistan. jim mcgovern, a prominent liberal democrat from massachusetts said, look, what we have in petraeus is a same menu, different way or the. >> norah, is it fair for people on the left to turn on the president when he is doing what he said he was going to do all along? >> they are debating the war funding bill in congress and
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they are getting more attention because of what happened with mcchrystal and petraeus but this war funding bill is going to pass, no doubt about it and petraeus is going to be confirmed by the senate next tuesday and what is going to be a hearing where they are keeping praise on him and an examination about the way forward. >> donnie, you're a big supporter of the president. are you disappointed in his handling of afghanistan? >> no. i think this is a turning point for him actually. i think this is the most presidential decisive move he has done this time. he has to clarify the message as we talked about. >> number two, top two issues remain, jobs and oil spill and no doubt bp contributed to this financial services atmosphere. big companies in the private sector a lot of questions about them in washington and i hope this bill doesn't create the havoc and harm that some have suggested think it will. >> coming up here, the marathon
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tennis match finally did end. what is the winner get? another match today! good luck with that after they played 138 games in the fifth set. we will have highlights from wimbledon and be back with donnie, norah, harold, halpern and heilmann sleeping in l.a. when we come back. [ birds chirping, animals calling ] ♪ [ pop ] [ man ] ♪ well, we get along
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all righty! welcome back to "morning joe," everybody. good morning! time for a look at some of today's top stories. on capitol hill, republicans dealt a blow to president obama yesterday by blocking an election year jobs bill. the senate rejected a measure that would have extended unemployment benefits for millions who have been out of work long term and republicans fully united the bill came down to 57-41 and democrats three short of the 60 needed to advance the measure. donors who contributed nearly 400,000 dollars to a legal defense fund for former alaska governor sarah palin will be getting their money back. an investigators determined yesterday that the fund was illegal because it was misleading. the investigator also said that palin acted in good faith and probably did not know that she
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had violated any ethics rule. she was tweeting about that. a mother has a newspaper ad is reunited with her son. the past 43 years she has placed a jen gentleman nair gentleman nair after decades of waiting she was finally reunited with her son this week. what a story. >> apparently he saw the ad in the paper and he just went over and knocked on her door. can you imagine? >> unbelievable that she had put an ad in the paper for 43 years. wow. >> good ending there. let's turn to sports now. d.c. got another phenom. strasburg in baseball. last night, the nba draft. >> with the first pick in the 2010 nba draft, the washington
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wizards select john wall from the university of connecticut. >> can i point out? the guys were looking very sharp last night. the suits. five, ten years ago it was like the nine button purple suits. >> you can't find those anywhere now. >> you can't get them any more. >> you used to rock those. >> i said give me six bucks. >> the guys were looking good last night. john wall will come to the wizards and a bunch of his teammates were taken. there is the list there. here is the match we were talking about before. swarms of media and fans looking on to see, they hoped, the end of the longest match in tennis history continuing for a third day yesterday at wimbledon. they came back tied at 59. american john isner played his
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tennis in college at the university of georgia. he took on mahut. they don't play tie breaks at wimbled wimbledon. isner is up. mahut on the serve. the first break of the 138 games played in the fifth set. isner wins a nair marathon match over the span of three days shattering any previous record for tennis matches. here is isner praising his opponent after the match. >> what more can you say? the guy is an absolutely warrior. it stinks someone had to lose but to be able to share this day with him was an absolutely honor. i wish him nothing but the best and maybe i'll see him somewhere down the road and it won't go 70-68. >> it was fun to watch the guys compete. they were applauding each other for great efforts and shrugging
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their shoulders and giving each other hugs and went into bathroom breaks chatting together. >> massages? >> the whole thing. >> that's like winning 12 sets. >> yes. >> he had to go -- it was really -- >> he played 15 sets easement he played an entire tournament in one match. >> i don't think in any sports, hitting streak, back-to-back triple plays, the chances of a 70-68 is almost stunning. i'd love a statistician to -- >> he had more than a hundred aces in this match alone did isner. incredible. another shocking upset at the world cup. italy who won the whole thing in 2006 is out. thanks to lowly -- it says lowly here. i don't like to say lowly. a cross shot by italy but stopped right at the goal line. replay shows it did -- oh, i don't know. did not cross. they say it didn't any way. 2-1 slovakia. italy getting desperate.
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italy puts it in but the ref says he was offsides. no goal. italy loses and knocked out of the tournament. it's the first time italy has failed to advance in group play since 1974. >> willie, i have an e-mail from the slovakia em bassey. >> a huge win by the united states sending them into the round of 16. president bill clinton was at the game and celebrating afterwards. there he is pounding budweiser in the locker room. >> look at that! >> what an expression! >> there it is. that's my man right there. >> it's not a bid light lime. >> no. bill clinton drinking budweiser in the locker room. united states plays ghana tomorrow. >> divan. >> ghana? >> they beat the u.s. last time. >> i'm told by experts that the
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united states has the easiest path. >> we just don't care much about soccer. i know i will get letters and my ratings will go down because of the soccer fans. >> didn't it sound like i knew what i was talking about there for a second? >> you got to be excited, though. you like a national moment, right? >> i love the world hugging together. one kind of thing but the actual sport? the actual sport itself? >> i love everything but the game. >> shorts, i like. the whole thing. >> people in the bars celebrating. >> that's it. >> i'm all for that. the big game is tomorrow against ghana. red sox and rockies last night. dustin pedroia, the little fellow, putting a whooping, scrappy, i should say. >> bucky. >> putting a personal whooping on the rockies hitting three home runs. that was his first and here is another one in the fourth inning. the most important one, his third. in extra innings, the game tied
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at 11. pedroia in the tenth goes deep for a third time. three home runs for pedroia. red sox win the game 13-11. coming up next, this morning's must read opinion pages and mika is faxing them in as we speak. plus did a congressman really say minorities aren't, quote, good, average american people? let's hope not. you can listen to "morning joe" live on satellite radio sirius 90' xm channel 20. [ female announcer ] when you look 10 years younger, you're proud to admit your age.
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>> the reason i and other of my colleagues have fought for this program isn't because we are trying to give relief to people that aren't responsible that don't know what the hell they are doing or don't care what they are doing. we're giving relieve to people that i deal with in my office every day now unfortunately, but because of the longevity of this session, these are people not minorities and they are not defective and not all of the things you would like to insinuate these programs are -- these are good, average american people. >> congressman kanjorski, the democrat from pennsylvania. put in in context. mark halpern, put that into a little perspective for us before we go after it. >> it's at a minimum a very unfortunate set of word choices and i think when this is one of those instances you will hear people say if this was a
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republican congressman the outcry would be greater. i think sometimes in a live situation, on live television or in a congressional hearing, people don't choose the right words and i think it's incumbent upon the congressman to explain what he meant and for people to look at his record and peer into his heart to make sure that this was just a verbal slip and not representative as republicans are charging up a mindset, but no doubt about the fact if you parse exactly what he said, that was not a great thing to say. >> harold ford, let's be clear. he said they are not minorities. these are the people getting help from this program. these are average, good american people. >> look. i know paul kanjorski. i think it was a complete slip of words. i served with him. he comes from a congressional district i don't believe a large number of african-americans or
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latino sqaets. you have to look at the context. i agree with mark he has to show his record but you've not heard members of congress criticize or members of the congressional black or hispanic caucus. i think a poor choice of words but i think his point is an important one. this recession is hitting every demographic and to suggest that only blacks or whites or hispanics or one group is singled out is the wrong thing. the real issue, republicans blocked the jobless age bill last night. the fact we are saying to the 1 is.3 million americans who receive jobless aid we're going to cut it off a un-american here. i think the bigger issue that paul kanjorski was trying to address. >> i think he is trying to -- you just get a sense -- i don't know the man obviously, like you do and, obviously, the words were unfortunate. you get a sense there wasn't the mali
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malice. we are 24/7 media world and mikes every day and the world will get statements that are unfortunate. >> what about the point that mark halpern said. if this were republican would you have your pitchfork out and run him out of town? >> i don't think so. >> kanjorski is supporting the bill. the republicans are against the bill so not as if he is making these comments saying i'm going to oppose it. in fairness if republicans supporting this bill, i think we would have a different impression about this. orrin hatch made a point we need to drug test those who are receiving this aid. if we do that, why not drug test defense manufacturers who are receiving contracts. it's a context you have to put all of this in. >> donnie, do you really want to say the republican brand doesn't stand for racial tolerance? >> no. i didn't say racial tolerance. i said tolerance overall.
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i think the democratic brand -- you will not say it's a more conclusive brand the democratic brand throughout history? >> lincoln was inclusive, i felt. >> overall, was it fair to say if we went congressman by congressman and politician by politician -- >> i don't know how far back in history you want to go but i think probably during the civil rights fights in the 1960s you had democrats who weren't particularly conclusive in -- >> obviously, objections on both issues. if we wright a thesis on what the brands stand for as democrats more conclusive brand, i think it's inarguable. >> all i'd say is that you have slips of the tongue. sometimes you can say they are revealing something or not. i just think if you two are going to be so tolerant of what he did and i'm not saying we shouldn't be. i'm usually forgiving people and looking at their overall records but the next time a republican says something unfortunate i'm going to remind you you two of what you said today.
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>> what he said was obviously very wrong. >> i can make an argument you've seen the republicans nominate an african-american in south carolina and an indian-american in south carolina. the reality is about the jobless aid bill. if the republican made the comments that paul kanjorski did in support of the bill i think it's a context is the only point i make. next time you find a republican that makes a comment, i mean, i think i've been consistent but i think you can't ignore the context of this debate. kanjorski used a poor word choice without doubt but you can't ignore the fact he supports the bill which is what the debate was about he was speaking to. >> obviously, what he said is wrong, no question about that. the culture of exposure, general mcchrystal was excellent at his job and outstanding relations with the white house and entirely proper
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relationships with the state department. >> hello? >> i love the kvetching. can we translate that to people at home? complaining. >> the question turns as harold said what do we do in afghanistan with the man in charge now. [ jet engine roaring ]
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all right. enough with all of the serious news and get to the nonsense. the top three stories of the week. ♪ >> at number three, act like a lady! the new york yankees said this week that lady gaga is still welcome at the stadium, despite the fact that she barged into the locker room to chat up the players, while wearing a bra and panties and slamming whiskey from the bolts. >> it's okay if you don't feel like a winner. >> jerry seinfeld spoke out about her performance at a recent mets game where she was upgraded from her seats to
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seinfeld's vacant luxury box. how long are these shifts? >> this woman is a jerk. this is what you give people the finger and you get upgraded? >> gaga fell down in an airport this week while wearing giant shoes and appeared on the cover of "rolling stone" in a bra made of machine guns. at number two. >> score! >> americans sports fans found another good reason this week to drink in the morning! landon donovan's dramatic goal beat algeria and sent the united states to world cup sweet 16. >> we're just very proud of this team that we have and i think we're a team that america can be proud of too. >> another american who did his country proud john isner who spent most of the week playing in a single match in wimbledon. >> the body is not feeling great. i have no skin on either of my
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pinkie toes. >> he took the set by the absurd basketball score 70-68 and winning a match that lasted over 11 hours over a span of three days. >> nothing like this will ever happen again. >> number one story of the week. >> the today, i accepted general stanley mcchrystal's resignation. >> mocking, indirectly criticizing an american president. >> calls national security adviser jim jones, quote, a clown. >> biden? did you say bite me. >> when your staff calls the national security adviser a clown stuck in the 1980s it doesn't go over realing with back at hg. >> you're with this i'll never print this magazine, right? >> president obama called mcchrystal to the white house and yanked him and went to the bull pen for his all-time
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closer. jen david petraeus announced his bold new strategy to turn the tide in afghanistan and bring the troops home. bras with machine guns. i don't know if that will work. all of the soldiers wearing a bra with machine guns on them. wale see what happens. that's enough for this hour. you've done enough damage for ek week. chuck todd joins "uss live and dan senor is next. [ female announcer ] number one dad lost his number one status when he forgot to make the morning coffee. so world's best mom was more than happy to make a cup of delicious starbucks via. she got to the office just in time to save best friend forever from the office coffee. best friend forever bravely shared starbucks via with don't talk to me until my second cup before he even had his first. he shared it with i hate mondays
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♪ >> i appreciated very much the opportunity to hear president medvedev vision for modernization in russia, expect high tech. a personal passion to the president. during his visit this week he visited the headquarters of twitters where he opened his own account. >> what is that? a combination of twitter and twizler. seems to me somebody is has been talking to president bush. >> on the internets. >> the internets, plural. welcome back to "morning joe." it's willie geist. joe and mika have the day off. well deserved. with us is the chairman of
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deutch incorporated is johnny deutch. >> by the way, it's an hour. joe and mika are not here. where are they? has one written in special. >> chris, what are the folks saying some. >> a lot of e-mails but overwhelming why is donnie there! >> exactly! >> you've earned those e-mails the first hour. from the council on foreign relations and foreign policy adviser to the bush administration, dan senor. the author of "start-up nation." good to see you. >> good to see you reassured by the developments the last 48 hours with general petraeus heading to afghanistan which is good news. >> let me ask you a question in the sense of going back to the you you made us a less safe country. you need us. do we live in a world now the pattons and macarthur would not survive the mentality versus generals need to be politicians?
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is the age of the crusading general over? >> i would say that the general has to help not only prosecute the president's war strategy but help make the case for the president's war strategy. it is true the civilians ultimately make the decision but what has been so powerful about petraeus is the credibility with which he can make the case. and he has political media skills that are second to none. i've just seen him. >> the first judgment whereas at the end of the day a warrior, which is what a general is, i not being a psychologist i can argue that is counterintuitive. >> can i say one thing? part of what petraeus' strategy has been, the past administration's war strategy and this administration's war strategy is winning over the civilian population in the battlefield. that requires media skills and political skills and tribal negotiation skills. his political skills have relevance on the battlefield.
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>> norah o'donnell is with us. great to have you. from los angeles, "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halpern and new york's magazine john heilemann and they are the authors of the run-away best seller "game change." i got e-mails they want to make sure you're breathing, john. >> and less from? >> someone who is wearing a vest. the guy in the vest should speak more was the only one i got. >> speak less. >> john heilemann you're up at 4:00 in the morning. we're turning here as dan has for us to afghanistan and what the future is away from general mcchrystal's poor media skills and what the mission is now. what does president obama do from here? >> well, the up with thing that is true is that as a lot of people have pointed out stanley mcchrystal's counterinsurgency plan in afghanistan is david
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petraeus counterinsurgency plan from iraq. the situation in those two countries is different and it's possible that -- quite possible that strategy will fare differently in afghanistan than in iraq. at least for the time being, you have continuity of policy here going forward, possibly a change in course as we go forward. there are a couple of big milestones ahead in afghanistan. one is the policy review that's set for the end of this year that general petraeus now and the president will under take and next july when we look at what the president said the beginning of drawdown of troops. those are two big milestones and now to the president an general petraeus have to look at those and see exactly where we stand and what it holds for the future. >> we will pick this up in a second. news, norah. overnight news in the senate. >> big news breaking this morning. house and senate negotiators considered a sweeping overhaul
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of banking regulations and passed earlier by the house and the senate xt bill represents the most ambitious rewrite of wall street rules since the great depression. it also forces large failing firms to liquidate and sets new rules for financial instruments that have been largely unregulated. the house and senate are expected to vote on the final bill next week in hopes of sending the bill to the president by july fourth. >> dan senor, bottom line on this. is this a big move? >> it is a big move. i think at the end of the day, it's a response to a past crisis and i'm not sure it's going to be the antidote to a future crisis which is often the case with regulatory bills. it was a response to worldcom and enron and this is a response to something that happened two years ago. we are dealing with potential crises in the future that may not resemble in any way -- >> one thing haze has shown us greed will find a way to play outside of the lines of the playing field. so this is the right move,
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obviously, but to dan's point we don't know what the next junk bond is. a financial instrument created that we don't have an answer for. >> i will tell you this. no matter how this bill is written, the u.s. taxpayer will still be on the line. there is no way that this bill will cover the cascading effects, will compensate for the cascading effects in the economy if there is a major systemic crisis. >> mark halpern talk about how this came together. we understand that blanche lincoln at the end of the day compromised a little bit? >> the house bill was, in most ways, tougher. i think a lot of the -- this was all democratic action. i think the advantage you had in this conference was you had two chairmen, both were smart guys and barney frank and chris todd. as we said earlier the bill is tougher. it helps if you have two chairs who are tough and smart and want
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to work together and get a result. >> blanche lincoln agreed to a compromise on the derivatives crackdown she has been pushing so hard on. norah, what else? bp shares hit a 14-year low this morning after the oil giant revealed the total cost of its response to the gulf crisis has reached $2.35 billion. mississippi officials report today that large amounts of crude are now moving closer to that state's fertile barrier islands. in florida a popular section of beach near the alabama border has been closed and tropical storms are forming around the gulf and could head into the oil-soaked waters the next few days. the debate over the government's deep drilling moratorium drags on today after a federal judge said yesterday he would not reconsider his decision to halt the ban.
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the interior department has said it will appeal the decision. >> donnie, this is back on the front pages now, the petraeus decision has been made and krs mcchrystal is out. a creep to this story. two months now since the oil rig exploded and just seeing oil on the beaches in pensacola yesterday and coming into mississippi. this is going to be a long problem for the president and politicians. >> this one, unfortunately, does not have a ribbon to tie up. this is going to go through christmas. unfortunately, obviously, there is a villain here, bp, but it's not -- we need oil and this is an unfortunate, you know, result of our need for oil and it's just -- there's not a clear villain and not a clear solution. it's bad story that continues. >> john heilemann, you write about bp in the latest issue of "new york" magazine. is this a moment for us? we've had so many moments before. we've been woken up about our
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dependence on foreign oil whether it was 9/11 or other times and frankly not done much about it. is this any different some. >> gosh, i hope so, willie. you think if not now, when? it's clear the president is committed to try to do something in terms of getting the energy bill passed but the politics of it are difficult and especially the politics doing something significant which is to say not tinkering around the edges but putting a price on carbon and driving america through policy incentives towards a different cleaner, saner energy future. it's a very hard push and although i think the president is serious getting it done, it's not clear to me there is the bipartisan support for that big effort that would be required to move the need along this issue. >> mark, is it possible this goes along the board without the sea change event that a lot of people think it ought to be for energy policy in this country? >> well, i think that, you know, one of the casualties in the short term of the flap over
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mcchrystal was the president was supposed to have a key meeting on wednesday with senate -- senators of both parties to come up with energy legislation. i think it's pretty clear the white house is ready to cut a deal and there are some republicans, the usual suspects like the two senators from maine, and massachusetts and also others like senator lugar who are ready to do a deal on energy and short of a cap-and-trade scheme. i would be surprised if there weren't energy legislation significant this year. maybe not until after the election but i think the momentum is there for it and, look. we saw what the derivatives of the wall street regulation bill. the president is pretty good at getting legislation passed that is high on his agenda and this has to be high on his agenda this year and it is and i think they will get it. president obama's national security team making first public comments about mcchrystal leaving his post as the top commander in afghanistan. at a pentagon briefing
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yesterday, defense secretary robert gates and admiral mike mullen said there was no excuse for the controversial comments mcchrystal made to "rolling stone." >> honestly, when i first read it, i was nearly sick. it made me -- i literally physically, i couldn't believe it. so i was stunned. >> in the 3 1/2 years that i've been in this position, i have not felt any tension or issues with respect to my relationship with our uniformed leaders or people in the ranks. this is an anomaly, not a systemic problem. later today, president obama will shift his attention to the economy as he heads to toronto for this weekend's g-20 summit.
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yesterday sh at a news conference with russian president medvedev, the president was focused on the war in afghanistan insisting the change of commander does not mean a change in strategy. the president dismissed suggests that it would shake up his time for withdrawal u.s. troops set to begin next summer. >> we did not say that starting july in 2011 suddenly there would be no troops from the united states or allied countries in afghanistan. we didn't say we would be switching off the lights and closing the door behind us. we said as we begin a transition phase in which the afghan government is taking on more and more responsibility. >> that answer was arguably the president's clearest description yet of his timetable for bringing troops home next year. a schedule that many analysts feel is unrealistic since the afghan conflict is growing
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increasingly violent. after touring capitol hill yesterday, petraeus said that his appointment did not alter the plan troop withdraw. when asked about mcchrystal's dismissal, petraeus said it is very sad he had to consume control of afghanistan in such a manner and that he had enormous respect for general mcchrystal. dan, i think you're one of the people who read the entire article, as did i. you disagree with the president's decision? >> i think stanley mcchrystal is one of the most talented commanders we have. he headed up joint special operations command. his job basically was to work with army rangers and delta force, a range of special forces and kill as many al qaeda terrorists over the last eight, nine years. he has led this in a sway no one else has led. he would go into battle himself. he did not criticize the policy. this is the important distinction. i think the comments were more
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from his subordinates than from him, but he was not criticizing the policy. he was not criticizing the president nor the policy. his frustration was with some of his civilian counterparts who he felt were not implementing the strategy that the president had committed to. >> had no choice. >> no, no. i just want to -- it's important to keep it in context here. this was not macarthur/truman and not a criticism of bush in that "esquire" magazine. his frustration was did he have any choice, did obama have any choice but to cut him loose. yes or no? >> i will answer your question. if there was no general petraeus to step in, i think it would have been a bad call. >> he would have been gone. he had no choice as a commander in chief in this country. >> no doubt. i think the point you made is so important to make because if you have to scour this closely and
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attribute who the quotes are to in this particular article because i think mcchrystal has a record of 30 years close to his troops. why on his 33rd wedding anniversary and his wife comes to visit in paris he takes his wife and the whole team america to kitty o'shea's in paris and they get drunk and talk to this reporter? >> i've been there. let me make this point. these guys, mcchrystal and his team, clearly did not get very good advice about sitting down and giving this kind of exposure so a freelance reporter from "rolling stone" magazine. when i was in iraq we got approached all the time by glossy magazines who want to come in and do these profile pieces. these reporters have not interested in the relationships and the beat they are covering. two, they have a long lead time. so they are not reporting news as it's breaking so the only way this piece becomes relevant if there is something juicy in
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there months down the road. >> you're not blaming the reporter for what -- >> i'm blaming -- >> the pentagon acknowledges it was a bone-head -- >> i'm blaming mcchrystal and his team for letting this guy have the access he had. >> we turn to chuck todd, our white house correspondent. he is live in toronto where the president will join this weekend's g-20 summit. what is the president doing up there, chuck? >> it is a g-20. by the way, a football field over my shoulder. i only bring this up because it's an american football field. not one of those crazy canadian football fields! i was hoping we would have the 110 yards. the president up here, it is all really about the economy. trying to do a few things. number one, he is going to bring this bank reform bill, this deal had he got today and have remarks in an hour or so this morning before he leaves for toronto. and use it as saying, see? we've done it. now come on, the rest of you
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g-20 nations, you do it as well. get your bank reform deals done as well. and then there is going to be some conversation, which is interesting, about, okay, when do you stop the government stimulus? when do you start worrying about your debt some because it isn't just america that has a debt that's a problem. it's a lot of these huge economic countries around the world that have -- that are starting to deal with deficit problems themselves, particularly the european nations that are going to be here. >> put on your hat as political director. news overnight out of the senate. looks like some agreement has been reached on financial regulation. what is your take? >> well, look. it was one of those things that it polls very popular. i think what is interesting to see is republicans, when you see the final vote after the compromised deal, how many republicans end up voting for it. you know, in our nbc/"the wall street journal" poll one of the things we asked there is talk about too much government, is government too big?
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then we asked specifically in a range of about six or seven issues do you think there need to be more or less regulation? we asked this about the oil industry. 60 plus percent said more oil regulation and asked it about wall street and about 54% said we need more regulation. a clear majority. health insurance companies, mant said more regulation. wall street is one of those things as angry as they are at government the populace is even more angrier. i bet it's more than two or three that crossover. i wouldn't be surprised to see if it's double digits. >> a study on goldman sachs versus bp and goldman sachs is still below bp so, obviously, wall street will be the bad guy. does the average american know what is in this energy bill?
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>> that's interesting. when we did our favorable ratings of bp, bp is below the lows we had, for instance of the tobacco industry when they were at their low, had a lower favorable rating than o.j. simpson, only really had a higher favorable rating than fidel castro. >> did you throw goldman sachs in there? >> apparently, we should. >> it's stunning. rented over the last few days. >> ouch! i don't think folks don't quite understand what is in it yet, but they will know if nothing has been done and i think as they go forward, what is it about this bank fee? what is it about the t.a.r.p.? that is probably what people will be able to feel. you know what? i think people have a hard time touching this. they just know government needs to do something. >> chuck todd live in toronto at the g-20, thanks so much. have a good weekend. >> you got it. hockey hall of fame, willie. >> that's right. my great grandfather is in the hockey hall of fame.
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>> congratulations! >> is that true? >> yes. he played for the detroit red wings in the '30s. the captain of the team, won two stanley cup and you know what his big endorsement deal was as a professional hockey player? camel cigarettes. an ad of him in his uniform holding a stick on the ice with a cigarette in his mouth. >> nice! >> folks from madison avenue! >> those were the 1930s, baby. >> i miss those days. >> chuck will be watching you guys on the daily rundown. thanks for coming in this morning. when we come back a preview with "meet the press" with the moderator david gregory. [ whistling ] [ dog barking ] [ sniffing ] [ male announcer ] missing something? like 2 pairs of bifocals for $149.99 at sears optical, with progressive lenses for just $25 more per pair. hurry in to sears optical today and don't miss a thing.
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♪ good looking shot of mika. mika and joe are off today. i'm here with a good crew.
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i have donnie and norah and harold and halpern and john in l.a. there they are! >> why would you guys get up at 3:00 in the morning? i haven't heard about the book. a movie. a fashion line. must be something you are up at 3:00 in the morning. >> personal fidelity to willie geist. >> there it is! you guys are the best. here with us is the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory. good morning, david! >> fashion line idea. can't you see the distressed t-shirts that say "game change"? >> ironic tease. i love it! >> these guys are out until 2:00 a.m. and got a cup of coffee and rolled in. >> exactly right. exactly what happened. david, i imagine on "meet the press" you will be talking about what happened with stanley mcchrystal this week, and more importantly, what it means for the mission in afghanistan.
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>> well, that's really it. we're going to have a special hour. special edition of the program and devote the entire hour to the future of the war in afghanistan. we will have senator mccain on the program and put together a unique panel of journalists. wes moore who is a veteran of afghanistan. as well as general barry mccaffrey. we will cover all aspects of it to talk about what the change actually means. i think striking that one of the things -- and congressman barbara lee who is strongly opposed to the war in afghanistan from the very start. when the president came out this week and said this was a change in personnel and not a change of policy, something that dan senor referred to a moment ago, the question should it be more than that? is this a time for a reset in this strategy? one of the things in my research that stood out to me is that if you look at the surge, what they are doing, the 30,000 troops won't really be in place until
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the fall. therefore, you will have less than a year of full fighting force of the united states and nato forces. before the deadline to begin a troop withdrawal. so the question is, is that enough time to pursue and win a counterinsurgency? is counterinsurgency really the best strategy? so i think all of these things need to be on the table now. >> david, to your point the reset button it is an opportunity for the president. do we live in a world now it's never going to be easy to clearly position a war? the days of pearl harbor being bombed that all wars come down to fighting this faceless enemy, terrorist thats take on shapes and sizes. is there way of selling a war today in effect? >> i don't think that's the case. we can't as a country allow ourselves to get in a notion to committing young men and women
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to die is so opaque we can't explain it. i think one of the difficult questions is, you know, does -- is what happens in afghanistan, does it stay in afghanistan? this is tom friedman's point this week. does it resonate? even if can you nation build in afghanistan in the way you want to and get a stable government, reduce or completely eradicate the flungs of al qaeda and diminish the potential of the taliban, what have you achieved? >> that's my point. >> well, you got al qaeda and pakistan. but that's the goal is different, but this is the issue. i mean, this is the issue of whether we're actually achieving what we set out to achieve. i do think, to your point, what is difficult about this is just that it's implicated. it's incredibly complicated. you have an enemy in al qaeda and a different kind of enemy in the taliban which really doesn't
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want to harm the united states, but you have a country in afghanistan that is so difficult to manage. i remember president bush telling people before he left office that afghanistan would be, by orders of magnitude, more difficult than iraq. and this was at a period when iraq did not look as promising as it looks today. >> david, i think you raise all of the right points and curious to hear answers. i guess in your research, what are the two or three, if not one, objective that militarily we have in afghanistan today? i'm interested and curious to hear john mccain's answer to this. what is it we are trying to accomplish and when bush was in office, democrats complained there were no benchmarks, no clear thresholds and no clear boxes you could check. in your research, what have you seen and what does you discern about the president's remarks this week that answered that question? >> i think that's a critical point. at what point should we see
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enough progress to think this strategy is working? because it's not working so far. the mardja was mcchrystal's campaign. create not just a military victory but what he called a government in a box where there you give the afghan space to come up and do their thing to run the show. in fact, they haven't done that and the taliban has been resurgent there. january mcchrystal called it a bleeding ulcer. the objective is create enough space for the afghan government to flourish and create a civilian infrastructure and the institutions you need to build up their own fighting forces in such a way that we can fall back. the clear hold and build strategy. two points. i spoke to a couple of experts yesterday who said it is quite possible that the patient died in afghanistan way back in 2002 and 2003 and we don't know it yet. and that will be the very painful conclusion we reach at
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some point. in other words, the moment has passed and not enough trust in the afghan people, among the afghan people in the united states, and nato forces, or in the afghan government, for them to move forward. you know, the second point goes to the idea that in july of 2011, that will be the first opportunity we have to see whether or not things are working. that will be really the first opportunity to get a good look as to whether it's working before we can automatically think about transitioning troops out. >> mark halpern, in l.a., has a question for david. >> david, one of the many challenges a president has got in dealing with afghanistan is getting the support of republicans true bipartisan for this. i think you have the perfect guest in senator mccain. he is a great barometer. is your sense the way republicans look at handling building bringing in petraeus and they are thinking you know what? this guy is commander in chief and he is stepping up or did they not attack him because
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petraeus is a big symbol and they will save their fire for another day? i think it's a little bit of both. if you're not faithful to a strategy in afghanistan and using the full weight of the american military how you don't support this president's strategy when he surged up forces along the lines of what president bush did in iraq. ironically, candidate obama didn't oppose that surge in iraq but he has done it here and reprocessed the war which is what you hear from senator mccain and others on the right saying that was the biggest failing of the bush administration. senator mccain and others say the problem with the strategy is is the july 2011 deadline. it is only a deadline to begin the transitioning of troops and meant to put pressure on there. i certainly think we could see that deadline move at some point if conditions warrant. >> david, you know, the gospel at the pentagon is this coin
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strategy. it is this huge surge of troops not only to fight the enemy but to live among the civilian population. everybody has signed up on this. that's the key question. does mccain, do others believe it can be done in a year? >> well, i think that is the key question. i don't have the answer to it but i think that is the question has to be asked. i think opponents like the war like congresswoman lee will who will be on the program how long do we have to work before we know it's not working? again, this is the difficult challenge, whether too much time has passed that renders a nation building strategy like counterinsurgency to pay off there. >> david gregory, biggest question of the day and looks like you have a great group assembled there to talk about it on sunday.
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dylan ratigan is coming up and first, world cup hysteria. we will talk to our expert from espn roger bennett about italy's early departure. what happened there. and president clinton pounding budweiser with the team. we'll be right back. ♪ i felt so good like anything was possible ♪ and some coffee. - sure, cake or pie? - pie. - apple or cherry? - cherry. oil or cream? oil or cream? cream. some use hydrogenated oil. reddi-wip uses real dairy cream. nothing's more real than reddi-wip. [ female announcer ] you really don't think about the cost of office supplies, until it's your office. ♪ well, when you buy all these items at walmart, you'll save 30% or more versus the national office superstores. so you can take care of business -- can i have some more paper? [ female announcer ] or whatever comes up -- for a whole lot less. thanks.
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♪ >> mika revealing herself to be a complete turn coat. she was a yankee fan until a year ago. she goes to one red sox game and now she's a red sox fan. >> she turned the right way. >> what? donnie, handle norah for me while we do this. >> nasty letters. >> for a world cup recap the author of the espn world cup companion and co-host of "off the ball," our friend roger bennett. good to see you again. a great ambassador for the game. let's talk about the big one tomorrow, the united states and ghana. how do you handicap this? >> i found it hard to sleep last night. >> really? >> did it have anything to do with the soccer or something else bothering you? >> it's about the soccer and it's not about the soccer. i think the united states have got every chance to do everything we've ever dreamed of and the only challenge is ghana
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is a great team and incredibly strong defensively and put up a great challenge. the band wagon for this american team is growing. i think the worst thing that could happen for this team is bill clinton going into the locker room drinking a beer with the lads and taking their mind off of football. >> here is the picture here. >> there you are. >> why is that a bad thing? that looks to me. the president comes in and pats him on the back and shows him the nation is behind him. >> who is on the left? >> the guy on the left is bill clinton! he has fallen truly madly deeply in love with soccer. >> what is wrong with that? why does that bother you? >> a team forgot where they are. they are focused on their goal. every single game they play is a referendum on this country. >> ghana beat the u.s. four years ago, right? >> y they did. absolutely.
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this time a slightly different team and love to take penalties and the only way they can score but stiff opposition. if america start to think on the big things, book contracts and cigarette ads like your grandfather, this is not well. >> the world cup fervor that willie and i missed. no matter what happens, why is this not a key sport in this country? why do we, as a country, will we not embrace it? >> i think the opposite is occurring. willie looked down his nose at me when i first came on the show. >> still does. >> he looked down his nose at me. this man has got world cup fever. who is your team some. >> argentina. >> you're on your own. the demographic who are loving this are young and aflount and advertiser's dream and they play
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fifa world cup on their playstation. the mls is a different thing and talk about that -- >> real quickly. italy. what happened? defending champion. >> newspaper headlines italy is shame without end and worse than france and worse than everybody. they only play well if they have a scandal domestically and they didn't have that. >> i knew it would appeal to you. within a week, donnie, you are going to turn. >> no italy and no france. >> it looks great for america, it really does. the english papers are going crazy saying french surrenders. the italians catapulted. world war ii all over again. >> what? >> great weekend of football. >> i'm glad they have this in perspective. >> absolutely. >> we cannot wait. we hope we're talking about a united states win when we meet
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again. >> usa! usa! >> we will be right back. ♪
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welcome back to "morning joe." earlier this week we talked to macoppenheimer and asked him about his latest report on religion on college campuses. >> wisenheimer is back. >> what? >> you write this time in your column about the possible crisis of faith among some college campuses, some students on college campuses. let me read from it, if i may.
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wow. >> talk about this crisis in faith. >> well, so what she realized was that that's a business misleading because what i go on to say is -- what she went on to say is that far more students are actually going to religious services but a lot of them are going off campus and going to the localer parish chapel church or a mosque or a black worship service down in springfield. it was really that the official campus employed chaplains didn't have that many people attending their services. and it was the off-campus energy of the kids going into the city or going to an evangelical bus
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sending a a bus to pick them up. >> it's fascinating. we've been hearing for some time that the church is dying, that main line denominations are going down. i've been stunned coming to manhattan. we bring tim keller on the show once in a while. >> sure. >> i go to redeemer services around with my family. it's stuping. they pack these places and i'm the oldest guy there. >> yeah. >> seriously people in their 20s and 30s, young families. i seriously have never seen anything like that the energy and excitement i've seen in new york city! so this old tired story about how faith is dying in younger people just don't give a damn? is that accurate? >> one of the general rules that scholars have realized where there is an official state church, people won't go.
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the queens is head of the church. england the official church and all you have to do to be a member is be born basically and it doesn't have any energy. what do you have to do to be an american? >> take it back to rome the church grew for two centuries before it became the official state religion of the roman empire. >> in some ways, you got a certain amount of energy from being the state religion. you get some money. but your energy kind of dies. so what they were seeing at smith college it was a scrappy off-campus church who were looking for members along the student body that were actually finding members. whereas, the official service in the chapel was getting, you know, a dozen or a couple of dozen people. also times have changed. you know, we don't have the sort of massive students looking for sunday morning services. >> willie? >> we have a chapel, i'm sure, at vanderbilt university. i never made his acquaintance. i wish hi. what does this tell us to joe's point about the kids? we hear of religions dying as joe said.
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can we take anything away from is whapg in college campuses to society in large? >> yeah. one of the things i tried to say in the "times" column maybe what you need to do for the kids is not give the official campus chapel. say here is an array of things you can do off campus and invite the off-campus clergy on. they are adults and we think it's fine for them to have a faith life but we're no the business of paying the salaries of their clergy. that is a pro religion move. >> the kids who are graduated college, is religion healthy among young people? >> it is healthy among americans. denominational loyalty is down. parents can't assume they raised a kid presbyterian. they will look for the pastor they most identify with. >> can you talk about what the reaction on campus was like
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this? >> it was fairly muted. twenty students showed up. largely not from students, some from alumni or towns folk isn't this a? they are firing the minister. but basically it was hardly noticed. >> do you do any undercover reporting in this story? >> the smith college? all women's college some. >> what i'm getting at. >> it was the wig makers. >> you didn't sense, though, from the administration at smith that this was a move justified some some separation of church and state? this was all about the fact that the kids just didn't want to go to state-sponsored chaplains? >> it was partly that. largely to close a budget gap and also realization that there is an office of religious life and what they are doing is running journal writing groups' leading morning hikes. they are looking at spirituality and
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wellness more generally. that has attraction more than the official here's a service on sunday morning. >> if a young student has a problem and they want counting from a rabbi or priest or preacher, smith's sets them up? >> absolutely. they're still going to have -- in fact, the rabbi told me he's probably going to do consulting. i think they'll still have relationships with clergy. they're just not going to be salaried clergy. >> the "new york times," mark oppenheimer, author of the new book "wis-en-heimer. we'll be right back with "morning joe." with expedia, when you book your flight and hotel
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back with us now, mr. sam tannenhouse, editor of the "new york times" book review and front page piece of john updike. sam writing about this search through 170 boxes of archives from the author. he discovered this. "though he was known and envied for writing rapidly and easily and revising very little, a reputation he encouraged, the archive demonstrates the painstaking care he took to establish the tone and atmosphere of his novels." sam, great to see you again. >> hey. >> tell us about this rare access you got over a couple of days to get in, get what you can
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for three days? >> well, you know, it's a spelunking mission. you grab what you can. no. i had help from the curator of the collection. hope library in harvard, working with these papers 18 years and was able to guide me some some remarkable stuff. and, yes, what you said is true. updike really likes to make it look easy and was famous at a very young age. the closest thing we probably had to a literate protege. his first short stories got published in the new yorker when he was still in college and he became famous for being the guy who could write about anything and do it on a dime, but then what you see actually look at the material, he was going over every word of it draft after draft. he just worked all the time. >> we take updike's greatness for granted. can you go back and put him in context, explain why he's such a great american writer? >> updike is the great
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chronicler of modern america. he was a farmboy from pennsylvania who loved this country with a kind of patriotism that's rare for great literary figures. not that they don't love america, they look tat in a different way, put it in a different context. updike loved everything about america. he loved the landscape, the people, the cities. he loved even the dying cities that he grew up near reading parks pa. pennsylvania. he wanted to preserve, almost like curator himself, the america he lived in. that's what the archives showed. not just all the drafts and revisions of the manuscripts but all the 2k5i8s collected. snapshots of storefronts. there's eve an peanut brittle wrapper that he put in the box for one of his very greatest novels, "rabbit at rest" because there's a scene in the novel, the former basketball king, devoyeurs the peanut brittle
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bar. what updike did to make sure he got it right, get the package, hold on to it. study it as if it were a rare item and preserve it in the archi archive. >> one of the complaints we hear, a lot of young people graduating from college don't write as well as they'd like and they have to put them through classes. interesting to hear how the greats, the length and time and effort he put into making his work perfect in his mind. i mean, how do we return to that era in so many ways as we hear those complain about that today? >> you know, it's interesting. harold, updike was actually not admitted to the creative writing courses at harvard. the professors didn't think he was a good enough writer. >> maybe they had -- >> could be. and what he did was to believe in the craft of writing. this is a guy who not only wrote his first draft by hand, in pencil, on the backs of previous manuscripts. to save paper. he typed them himself. even before the days of word
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processors. he designed his own book jackets, chose the type faces. kept track of every printing error so it could be corrected in later editions. did it all himself and expected nobody else to help him. >> sam, thanks so much. read about it in the "new york times." we know why we're here.
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the reason i and other of my colleagues have fought for this program is because we're trying to give relief to people that aren't responsible that don't know what the hell they're doing or don't care what they're doing. we've giving relief to people
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that ideal with in my office every day now, unfortunately, but because of the longevity of this recession, these are people and they're not in minorities and they're not defective and they're not all the things you'd like to insinuate that these programs are about, these are average, good american people. >> congressman paul kanjorski. we're tall about that in a moment. it's 8:02 here in new york city. joe and mika have the day off. super friends convened here. dylan ratigan in the house. donny deutsch, and mark halperin, john heilemann. explain to me why? >> they're awake. >> the h & h fashion line. casual wear for the casual guy. >> by the way, i was here before and did a logo for you. can't find it. >> did you? >> wow. >> telling me to be quiet, i was making too much noise.
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>> on the side? >> yeah. throw me from madison avenue to logos on the back of "morning joe." >> yeah. already focused. donny, we have an e-mail, while you're working on that. what are the good people saying? >> donny has done a complete 180 when it comes to fashion pap three-piece suit with no tie in the middle of summer. donny needs to understand, to be cool it has to look like you're not trying to be cool. >> oh, wow. >> donny's cool. just tries too hard with the look. >> i tell him that i miss the black t-shirt, shows his big muscles. nice and tight around the arm. >> you can't win. >> i can't win. >> you don't have to do it. >> i try for a little kind of fonzie-type thing with the black t-shirt. now i go to the travolta. >> always a down side. >> a man who understands fashion. >> you don't have to understand. >> thank you. thank you, sir. >> let's see your logo. >> joining us from the best dressed category, mr. eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist in the "washington
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post." >> good morning. >> we're sorting through that paul kanjorski sound bite, something we heard yesterday. what's your take on it? >> unfortunate. you know, it's -- look, it's not a huge deal. it is reflective, i think, of a mindset that people need to get over which is equating, you know, kind of white with normal and non-white or minority with somehow different. take a look at the census data, take a look around you, you see this country, perhaps it's a generational thing. i think most young people are beyond that point, and i think representative kanjorski will get there pretty soon. >> mark halperin, a little tricky. e-mail from jonathan from "the washington post" saying, take another look at it. felt he was condemning the point of view that he laid out there and maybe got caught, pulled out of context a little bit.
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what do you think? >> well, again i think he should come out and explain it. i am a big believer of not holding people in public life way zero tolerance standard if speaking in a live situation and say something they don't exactly mean rather than pretend you can look into their soul. let him come out and explain. he needs to do that in a big hurry. this is subject to criticism. as i said before, if it's for a republican doing it, you'd probably see a different reaction in some quarters. >> no question. eugene and harold, we see what really happened, take a step back. >> dylan, we'll get you in on the first story. financial regulation overnight. nora will set it up. >> big news, house and senate negotiators hammered out a historic overhaul of banking regulations assembled early this morning out of versions passed earlier by the house and senate representing the most ambitious rewrite of wall street rules since the great depression and forces large failing firms to
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liquidate and sets new rules for snl instruments that have been largely unregulated. house and senate are expected to vote on the final bill next week in hopes of sending the bill to the president by the end of the fourth of july and, willie, r50eding, too, on my playbook the president will make brief remarks about this in a conference before he heads to the g20 summit. >> might get that later in the hour. is this historic, dylan? protect us what praped two years ago? what's the deal? >> instead giving my opinion, briefly, form your own opinion. there's, there's a reason this happened. you have massive banks with a lot of leverage that were hiding their risk. that's why this happened. underneath that a conflict of interests between those like donny, say, and donny and i are work together. i'm a bank. donny's the rating agency. what does my fico score? show me 650, ratigan, you're good to go. i get a aaa. leverage, hiding risks, too big to fail. were any addressed in this
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legislation? no disagree with as a story. they thing that a lot of stuff. also they change a lot of stuff with the health care legislation, but didn't necessarily resolve the underlying problem with health care. i want you to think of this -- >> posing the so-called vocal rule? >> listen, that's an interesting concept doing absolutelying in to prevent further extraction of wall street. the purpose, invest money in the developments of the economies of america and the world. the lending sbis a utility in the modern universe and they made the lending business into a multi-trillion dollar compensative business because you are able to gamble wildly with other people's money. >> at least it's a step in the direction -- >> sure. i can point to lots of lists of things that will make you feel a little better about everything, but the conflict of interest in intact. leverage still there. too big to fail still exists. >> too big to fail -- trumps everything. >> trumps everything. >> one last thing. as if they watched the oil spill in the gulf for two years, let
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oil go all over the gulf as a result of a corrupt system, which is what our financial system is. it's a system designed to extract money, and two years after the fact, passed a law to change a bunch of things and did absolutely nothing to fix the problem. i don't think it will stop the bonuses created through extraction and i'm sure not create jobs, which is what wall street is supposed to do, invest money in the development of business our country that creates jobs. absence of jobs, absence financial stability and absence the end of the extraction i ask you what have the democrats accomplished? >> dylan ratigan is not swept up in this historic moment. are you? >> well, i'm n sure whether i'm swept up in it or not but i'd like to take dylan up on his offer. relentless critic of his bill throughout its process. i'd like, dylan, you said you could point to some things we could take heart in. name two things in this bill you
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actually like. >> two things in this bill i actually like, i think nora right. the rule and discussion about the volcker rule to diminish the ability for banks to willy-nilly spread risk, a diminishment in that. that's good, to donny's point, but won't protect. in other words, as it attack as a taxpayer, how i look tat in the context of my job, as taxpayer i ask myself, will this legislation protect me from all of those risks, and it won't, and that's why you get sort of the commentary. to answer your question, the volcker rule is encouraging an the consumer protections are very encouraging. those are the two things i would point to that deserve the most applause, but the actual structural aspects where the financial industry has two choices. either be incentivized to make money investing in america. if they do that well, they are rewarded through their own wealth, or they can extract from america by effectively creating all sorts of businesses whether
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short-term trading businesses or speculation credit risk businesses for which they can't actually bear the risks. >> you're punching a hole in the capital market system. >> i am not. >> listen to me. if i'm an investor in goldman sachs, their responsibility to me is not to invest in america. it's shareholder value. >> yep. i've heard that. >> i love what you're saying in theory. i love, they should be -- >> i get it. >> in reality, greed and capitalism, can you not ever fully regulate that. >> fair enough. and -- >> i agree with your issue, but you're looking -- looking for fundamentally impossible. >> can i respond? can i no longer pay my taxes? if the plan is to pay for a government -- let me finish -- if my plan, pay for a government who's supposed to be a referee on a game in which risk is expected to reside with the individual and the opportunity to achieve and wake up early and stay late and create value for nora and willie and bill and down the line, i can go out into the world, it's there.
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that solves a lot of problems, but if i go to the government as a unique individual. say a monopoly. you know this as well as anybody. all the businesses on the monopoly board. is the banker on the monopoly board? can i be the banker? you cannot. because banking is a utility. why is banking a utility? banking is a utility because banking is designed to facilitate -- >> run by the government. >> other businesses. what i'm saying, yeah, goldman sachs obligation, make as much money as possible. if the only way they know how to make money by altering the rules of capitalism so they no longer have 0 deploy capital instead can simply use access to capital as a speculative device to generate trading revenue for themselves without delivering any value to the country, why would the government allow a lawmaking -- a set of laws that effectively reverse the flow of capital? >> whatever the laws are, greed will find out -- >> i disagree. >> one more point to make. >> isn't dylan right about this?
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change a few rules but structurally, fundamentally, things don't change and the taxpayer ends up on the hook at the end offy das? >> no. the administration never set out, never wanted, a fundamental structural reform. if you talk to anybody in the administration, talk to secretary geithner, for example. i remember conversations i had with him about derivatives and are there derivatives so exotic, ridiculous you should outlaw them? and he basically said, no. that they're just design something more exotic and more toxic that isn't covered by the statute. clearly, the attitude was that it was not to go after that, the fundamental situation that dylan is talking about. and i basically agree with dylan that wall street -- the economy is now on the service 6 wall street as opposed to wall street being in the service of the commit. that has not changed and that's
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the wrong way around. >> a fundamental solution to this that's actually incredibly simple that goes to donny, everybody else's point which is, they'll come up with something. everybody says. i'm play all day, pop up with another product. you can't win. a valid point. this has been going on forever. personal responsibility for financial professionals, alaa salomon brothers. if it's a partnership our look at the person that articulated this best, jim grant in "the washington post," an op-ed, six weeks ago, i recommend you google, do jim grant and wall street i'm sure it will pop up. if you look at countries, in the past, brazil still has this law. other places around the world, were the executives. say the four of us run a bank. right? and the four of us can only be paid based on the capital structure of that bank. not just the equity structure of the bank. the debt of that bank, everything in that bank, and now
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if i see crazy donny out there doing a big deal, taking on a bunk of risk i go in the room with nora and willie, crazy donny's going to blow out of money on a swapski. >> i'm saying -- >> banks should not be bought. >> specifically, should not be allowed to go to the shareholder and the bondholder for capital and transfer the risk, because the combination of going to the shareholder and the bondholder with being too big to fail i need both of those things in order to pull this off. if i'm too big to fail, can my risk in the share and bondholder, they're like an electric cable that goes straight to the capitol building and we take all the money. >> mark halperin out in l.a. what do you got? >> here's why they're doing a jig at the white house today. sequencing exactly the way they want it. substantively like the bill, pushing for it to be tougher. like the outcome. think it's good policy. did it with democratic votes in the conference and noi will give republicans on final passage a choice. vote with the president and lep
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him get a bipartisan compromise or vote against it in effect in the minds of a lot of the public vote in support of wall street and against trying to regulate wall street. for them, it's a great day. sub starvetively might be happy, but they're wrong. politically, think it sets them up to have an accomplishment, either with republican support or putting them on the side wall street nep know the polls show that is not a great place to be. >> as chuck todd pointed out earlier, there could be a large number of republicans in the senate that end up voting for this. >> talking politics. you're not interested in politics. >> there's no job there's. so you can renovate -- saying we've pass add huge law for the gull of mexico, dealt with the oil spill. going to be proud of ourselves, stayed up all night and now there will no locker be oil spills, but we have not done anything to renovate the clul technology for blowout preventers, deepwater or anything associated with what's going on there. that's exactly what's happened here. i understand they may be very
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proud of themselves but the fundamental structure, if i run a bank right now, i am still operating at huge leverage. i'm still able to operate at huge leverage in secret and hide my risk. and i'm still in conflict of interest with the people who are supposed to be vetting my product being the ratings agencies and i don't actually know this. i know they were attempting to diminish shareholder rights that would go directly to our opportunity as shareholders to hold to account those banks. honestly, i don't know what happened to that. >> the boys in l.a., regardless, health care passed, financial reform passed, cleans up the oil. end of the day, come november, still have double digit unemployment, house going backwards. none of it matters? >> that make it is a tougher situation. mark is absolutely right. the white house is looking at this as another accomplishment that they can't point to, and
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that better to have it than not to have it. >> the banks on both parties, made it clear. republicans owned by the banks, offered no counterproposal. the democrats create read form didn't fix the problem. that's why 40% of all corporate, all lobbying money comes from the banks, and they give it to both sides. they're not stupid. >> is it true you were offered the main communications job -- >> it was. it is. >> seven figures. >> it is. >> like what you have to say. the way you say it. >> on message. >> you're on message. >> goldman knows we're on message, and so negotiating price tag. >> going together on "60 minutes." >> yes. >> and i can sort of explain why what he's doing is right. >> sure. thrilled to sit down and talk to you. >> oh, yeah. >> gene, stay with is. guys in l.a. stay with us. we'll keep this group intact as president obama reinforces his afghan policy, why are liberals turning out? the political playbook.
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and steve jobs comes up way quick and dismissive solution to the new iphone's reception problem. you'll want to hear this. later, the week in review. find out which of these assen nine stories makes the cut. first, bill karins is the weekend forecast an an update on severe weather here in the northeast. >> good morning, willie. yeah, severe weather rolled through philadelphia yesterday and bridgeport, connecticut. phillies game rained out. wind gusts up to 80 miles an hour and struggled to get the tarp down to protect the field. other breaking news, weather, what's happening in the gulf and caribbean. the national hurricane center says a 7% chance our first tropical depression on our hands. not in the place to see it. in general heading to the north over the next couple of days. as of now drifting towards the yucatan, first tropical depression of the year if it develops. becomes a tropical storm, into the kpurp models out of colorado
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state showing the general forecast line is where the storm would head. where louisiana is, mississippi and florida panhandle? that's where the oil spill is. a potential somewhere in that vicinity, four to five days from now. that is a grave concern for the cleanup effort. your weekend forecast, everything looks pretty calm. summerlike out there. not quite as hot as yesterday but very warm. not much changes saturday. bad weather around chicago with thunderstorms. interesting forecast over the weekend for the gulf of mexico. you're watching "morning joe." [ female announcer ] instead of drinking old office coffee, know it all made a cup of premium starbucks via. know it all shared it with single and loving it! who made a cup the next morning for ladies man as he was rushing out the back door.
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welcome back to "morning joe." joe and mika have the day off. oh, guys. >> oh! it's hot in here. >> can you imagine -- >> the real show is in a commercial break. >> it's getting hot in here. >> only on the internet. >> the "morning joe" on tv and then the "morning joe" commercial breaks. >> we should. >> website. >> the dwarf thing just took it to a whole -- >> let's move on to the morning papers. "wall street journal," cheeseburger diplomacy. told russian president medvedev he would vep accelerate the bid to join the world trade organization over a jalapeno burger. >> and washed ashore in pensacola. gone from beaches. cleaned up, buried or swept back into the sea.
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officials say about 20 ships continue to work night and day skimming for the oil. >> "los angeles times," headline says, passion alone cannot sustain the tea party despite scoring a big win this week of nikki haley in south carolina, the movement has just as many losses as victories. >> the "seattle times." boeing temporarily halted test flights of it dream liner checking for an assembly faux pas in the tail. not flying until inspections are complete. the company is still expected to deliver the first completed dream liner by the end of year. donny, you have to wait for your dream liner, i guess. >> donny doesn't fly commercial. >> basically got to go right to it. dylan and i were just -- touching my silly bands. do you know what silly bands are? your kids? >> from your kids. >> do you know what they are? >> no. >> okay. nothing. rubber. every kid, they go into shapes. this is -- >> you're a little nervous. >> this is a -- all, it's the
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rage with all kids in america. rubber bands but go into shapes. this is a flower. >> that makes them silly? >> the silly part. this is the rage. >> you should get some for your kids. >> donny was so hip. >> here's a story that might interest you. boston globe. the provincetown school system on cape cod will revisit its condom policy. the governor expressed concern yesterday very young children would have access to them before donny can speak, water balloons. >> kindergarten water balloons. politico, eder in chief there, a look at the playbook. good morning, john. >> good morning, willie. good to see you again. one of items on our playbook, of course, afghanistan policy. one of our -- totally up on capitol hill yesterday. president obama promised that
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the change in personnel, not a change in policy was not greeted favorably by a lot of house liberals for a long time upset about afghanistan policy. this is precisely the moment he should be looking at all questions including whether he needs a new war strategy. >> gene what you write about in "the washington post" today. how did the president do this week and where are we headed now in afghanistan? can you -- do what few people have been able to do on this show this week and clearly state the objective in afghanistan? >> no, i can't. >> there you go. >> honest person. >> donny, i can't -- >> at least you're honest. no. look, the president did really well this week, dealing with mcchrystal and i think bringing petraeus in was a brilliant political move. it vetted criticism on the hill. the fastest confirmation in history but he did not resolve the contradiction in the policy which is highway are you going
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to fix afghanistan and are you going to keep to the july 2011 deadline? and those questions are unresolved, and so you have people like me and george will, both writing that this -- something's got to give here. we're not going to fix afghanistan in a year. when george will and i agreed wholeheartedly on the policy thing, clearly we're both roth, i guess. up to the end of days. but this is going to build, i think, as casualties mount and as the contradictions, i think, in the policy, become more manifest. >> you and george can talk about that at your weekly poker game. it's the world cup, coming together. >> coming together. >> it's what happens. >> he wears those rubber bands on his wrist, too. >> he does. he loves silly bands. doesn't he? >> gene, thanks. another great piece in the
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paper. check it out. "washington post."com. and see you, too, at politico. and steve jobs tells new iphone user to get a grip. you'll want to see this, next. with expedia, when you book your flight and hotel
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[ male announcer ] turns shaving into gliding. and skeptics into believers. new fusion proglide. and a beautiful shot of times square where later this afternoon willie geist will audition -- >> i don't have to audition. >> you don't have to audition?
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sorry. you already got the job. >> ever seen me in a speedo. >> in a weeny bikini, yes. >> and i'm offended. i disagree. directly responsible. i believe your presence encourages this behavior among those around you. >> he's create add climate. >> an environment i. was offended by your objectification of men. seriously, you just objectified -- >> a -- he's not here today. >> reading the news. mika is auditioning for the -- >> off the air for ripping -- >> no? >> clearly absurd. >> all right. >> i was -- >> just protecting you. >> chris -- >> always objectified. >> i got an idea. let's read the news. >> good news. >> welcome back to "morning joe" and good morning. let's take a look at some of the day's top stories. bp shares hit a 14-year low this morning after the oil giant
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revealed that the total cost of its response to the gulf crisis has reached $2.35 billion. and in mississippi today, large amounts of crude are moving closer to that state's fertile barrier islands and in florida, oil forced authorities to close a popular section of beach near the alabama border. all of this as tropical storm are forming around the gulf. pretty scary. it could head into oil-soaked waters with the next few days. a former aide to ousted illinois governor rod blagojevich is claiming that president obama knew the governor wanted to leverage the president's senate seat into a cabinet position for himself. during blagojevich's corruption trial this week chief of staff john harris testified that his former boss was confident that if he appointed mr. obama's longtime friend he could get a top job. jarrett has been working on the obama presidential campaign for accepting current conditions as a senior white house adviser. the white house declined to comment yesterday on the testimony regarding the
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president and ms. jarrett. and apple ceo steve jobs has advice for people complaining about the reception on the new iphone. someone e-mailed jobs about losing bars while holding the new phone in his hand, jobs responded simply, just don't hold it that way. really? >> bite me is pretty much what he said. >> it's a very technical trouble shooting, don't hold it that way, you moron. our next guest spent 45 days, incredible story, as the prisoner of the taliban. his harrowing story of survival is next on "morning joe." we know why we're here.
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welcome back to "morning joe." earlier this week joe, mika and i sat down with jere van dyk, an american journalist back from afghanistan, with a new book out on his incredible narrow escape
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from the taliban. >> if somebody wrote about working with me. >> yeah. >> and call the book "captive" -- you work with this guy, he write as book about his time working with you. >> uh-huh. >> compares you to the taliban. i would not have a guy like this on the show. >> let's really talk about his captive here. >> she captivated me. >> here with us now, american journalist jere van dyk, alive to tell us about his 44 days in a dark cell after he traveled to the war zone along the of a phan/pakistani border. he is the arrange of "captive: my time as a prisoner of the taliban." >> i guess i rid the tilgt wrong. >> you might have. jere, good to see you. >> you, too. >> you used to work together? >> we did. >> all night long. >> right, over at cbs. totally captivateed by her. >> a big difference between what happened in afghanistan. >> idiots.
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>> talk about your harrowing experience. >> what i was doing was, i had worked in afghanistan during the 1980s, say free lance correspondent from the "new york times," and i had a relationship with then mujahadin. today half of those men are part of the afghan government. the other half, many taliban leaders, have gone up into the mountains. so i thought, drawing on my experiences from before i could disguise myself as a pashtun, i knew how to eat, walk, live in that culture. i could disappear as much as possible from the west. penetrate pashtun culture, go along the border with the taliban, tribal leaders and ultimately start to penetrate with no other journalist had done in so many years, the tribal areas of pakistan to find out really what was going on with the taliban. of course, al qaeda, what was really going on with the united states and pakistan government could not or were not telling us. >> and tell us now about your capture. how did it happen? and what happened after that.
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>> i was betrayed. i was -- hiking in the mountains. this is my fourth time across the border into pakistan. we were in an agency, sundown. my two bodyguards in the lead. i was third behind the interpreter and i looked up and saw a tinge of black move behind a rock. it wasn't a goat and it wasn't a sheep. i knew immediately it was a black turban. and i froze. and then they came running down the mountain. spread out about 12 of them, all with rifles and rocket propelled grenade launchers and i said, i'm dead. >> they captured you. where did they taky and what the next 44 so days were like for you? >> what happened next, they took me up. i still was trying to pretend that i wasn't an american. tried to speak the language and all my appearance, my banner, everything, was to disguise myself as one of them. i clearly didn't think this was
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going to happen. they took me up on to a ridge. i faced west. sat down. and i knew that something was going to happen and i began to think of my family, and then they began to blindfold me, and so then darkness engulfed me, and there's a sense of total helplessness. that i was in such shock i still kept my back straight waiting for what i thought what might happen. then they tied me. took us deeper into the mountains, and into a dark cell. and we were in this dark cell, about 12 feet by 12 feet and i could not see -- i could see something like you beyond that, i couldn't see beyond the room, and we were allowed out for three minutes at night. when i first got there i looked around for blood on the walls. >> you say, "we"? who else? >> what i didn't know. there was a certain sense of relief when i got there when they took off the blindfold that i wasn'ty loan.
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and then they came up to me and began to impair gate me. what was fascinating i began to step back somewhat emotionally. they said what is your name? i gave my name. and then they said what is your father's name? >> and i said, this is deep pashtun culture, they only care about your tribal lineage. the most important question in afghanistan is who is your grandfather? who was your father? deep tribal culture, and then i realized i couldn't keep the language up anymore and i said, i'm american. and i felt immediately extremely free, but i also knew that i was dead. again, i felt, they're going to kill me now. i'm a spy. and then i looked down and saw chains on the floor. and i knew that i was in a taliban prison, deep in the mountains, and it was, there was no way in the world that anybody could ever find me. so it was fear, and then what happened later that night, which
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made it even darker. gradually, continuing downward spiral was that my two bodyguards said after the taliban left that if they start to torture us, and we think they're going to kill us, then we have to kill them. and one bodyguard said, i'll take him. the one jailer. and the other guy said, i'll take him. and the taliban had gone -- they were in the next room. we could hear them in the next room. they were eating. what i realized was that i had to either kill or be killed. >> you were there 44 days? >> yes. >> and of those 44 day, talk about your relationship with the taliban to the point you were released? did it matter to them you were a reporter that had been there before when they were fighting the soviets? what did you -- did you adapt? why did you get freed?
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>> i don't know. i don't know why i'm here today. >> you don't know? >> i do think that people above them made the decision to release me. i also know that -- one specific night. the hardest -- there were many hard nights, but the hardest night was the fourth night when we had an interrogation, and they were about 12, 15 men in the room holding flashlights, all armed, all staring at me. the taliban commander and i were sitting on the floor two feet from one another, and i knew that i had to save my life in this conversation. so it was a matter of explaining to them who i was, the names that i knew from before. i also knew what names not to say, that the taliban are so diverse. people here say taliban. no, it's taliban-r, so many distinct group. so i knew i had to save my own life, and i continually talked like that, but at the very end
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what they did was, they took my camera, and they asked me how to start the camera, and behind me, how to make the camera work and behind me, i saw men come in and they stood behind me with their rifles and their fatigue jackets, and their sunglasses, and i realized, and i said to him, so you want me to film my own -- help you film my own execution? and so i sat there, and then i was afraid. i kept -- i couldn't -- i didn't have the courage to put my back straight, and all i thought of was, my father, and my brother and my sister, and i said their names, and it was so important for me to die with my back straight and to look at the camera, because i knew that the people would be watching me. so i was -- i did that, and i think at that moment when i saw
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them, they went knife, and i thought of pearl, and i said my brother and sister's names and they are children's names. i knew that i was not a coward, that i would die with dignity, and i think they saw that, too. >> there is so much more in this book. jere van dyk, your book is called "captive: my time as a prisoner of the taliban," an unbelievable amazing story. we're so glad you're here to tell it, and it was very good to see you again. thank you for sharing. we'll be right back with more "morning joe."
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all right. you've been very patient. the wait is over. it's time for the top three stories of the week. ♪ at number three, act like a lady. the new york yankees said this week lady gaga is still welcome at the stadium, despite the fact that she barged into the locker room to chat with players while wearing a bra and panties and slamming whiskey from the bottle. >> it's okay if you don't feel like a winner. >> meanwhile, jerry seinfeld spoke out this week against gaga's draw and panties
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performance as a recent mets game, where she was upgraded from her seats to seinfeld's vacant luxury box while he was off wondering what the deal is with the cab drivers. how long are these shifts? >> this woman's a jerk. this is what she gets people to -- you get upgraded? >> gaga also fell down at an airport wearing jines shoes and appeared on the cover of rolling stone on a bra made of machine guns. at number two -- >> goal! >> american sports fans found another good reason this week to drink in the morning. [ cheers and applause ] landon donovan's dramatic goal beat algeria and sent the united states to the world cup stweet 16. >> we're just very proud this team that we have and i think we're a team that america can be proud of, too. >> another american who did his country proud, john isnor, playing in a single match at
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wimbledon. >> body's not feeling great. no skin on either of my pinky toes. >> absurd basketball score. a war of attrition has lasted more than 11 hours after a span of three days. >> knock like this will ever happen again. ever. >> the number one story of the week -- >> today i accepted general stanley mcchrystal's roving nation. >> general stanley mcchrystal talks his way out of a job with an assist from the long haired hippies at "rolling stone" magazine. >> mocking, indirectly criticizing an american president. >> jim jones, called "a clown." >> biden, did you say, bite me? >> turns out when your staff calls the four-star general national security adviser a clown stuck in the 1980s, it doesn't go over well back at hq. >> wait. you're with, "i'll never print this" magazine. right? >> called mcchrystal to the white house, yanked him and went to the bull pen for his all-star
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closer. >> general petraeus and i were able to spend time this morning discussing the way home. >> general petraeus later announced his bold new strategy to turn the tide in afghanistan and bring the troops home. bras with machine guns. ♪ gaga >> think that's going to work. yes, you did just hear, let's hear it for the boy music on that piece. back to the '80s. up next what if anything did we learn today plus the daily rundown with chuck and savannah. [ diane lane ] when you were 14 we helped keep your skin clear. now we have a solution for wrinkles.
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i appreciate it very much the opportunity to hear president medvedev's vision for modernization in russia, especially high-tech innovation. as a personal passion of the president in bearing his visit to silicon valley this week he visited the headquarters of twitters where he opened his own account. >> twitters? what is that? like a combination of twitter and twizlers? sounds to me like somebody's been talking to president bush. >> on the internets. >> the internets. >> internets. >> george bush, famous about using "the google" to look at satellite pictures of his ranch. >> yes. >> do you miss him a little bit? a little bit. see? a little bit. president obama, by the way, about to get on to air force one, where he'll head up to the g-20 summit in toronto. a live picture you're looking.
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expected to stop, make a few remarks. cluck and savannah will have that on "the daily rundown." talk about what he learned today. we have to out of respect beginning with the h & h guys. been up since 1:00 in the morning. look a little better. i'm not going to lie to you. we're going to give you all the time you want. let's start with you, mark halperin. what did you learn today? >> well, down in sarasota, my niece, ready for her big soccer-themed party heard us talking about silly bands. never heard an episode of "morning joe." what i learned from her, the air jordan logo silly band is the one to get. at least in sarasota. did not know that. >> we give you your time and you took it. >> what else do you got? >> i'll tell you, new york city, willie geist. you can get anything. not so in burbank. we've been looking for a decent meal here all morning.
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no korean tacos. they got nothing here. we're coming home. >> get back to new york. go back to bed. back to sky bar, wherever you were. re appreciate you waking upper with his today. donny, what did you then? >> spectacular job. mr. geist, shoes for willie and mika. and, guys, charge $1 million for this. you guy, here it, on the house. fashion mind. halperin and heilemann. fashion minds. >> revealing branding. >> checking his blackberry there. >> that's the early focus group. >> i learned there's an economic recession, but dylan ratigan found money to build a garage in the hall on the set here. >> fix it week. called resource utilization. an empty warehouse, hung tools, brought cameras in there. a new overhead version. >> fix it week. >> starts next week.
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